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The National Security Agency is winning its long-running secret war on encryption, using supercomputers, technical trickery, court orders and behind-the-scenes persuasion to undermine the major tools protecting the privacy of everyday communications in the Internet age, according to newly disclosed documents. The documents do not identify which companies have participated. By 2012, GCHQ had developed “new access opportunities” into Google’s systems, according to the document. lost the heated national debate in the 1990s about inserting into all encryption a government back door called the Clipper Chip. Even agency programs ostensibly intended to guard American communications are sometimes used to weaken protections. One small e-mail encryption company, Lavabit, shut down rather than comply with the agency’s demands for what it considered confidential customer information; another, Silent Circle, ended its e-mail service rather than face similar demands. “Without Congressional action or a strong judicial precedent,” he wrote, “I would strongly recommend against anyone trusting their private data to a company with physical ties to the United States.” Update (9/6): Statement from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence: It should hardly be surprising that our intelligence agencies seek ways to counteract our adversaries’ use of encryption.